05 1 / 2014

12 8 / 2013

08 4 / 2013

turquoisekush:

What if men were photographed the way women typically were?

Photos are by Sylvain Norget 

(via pushing-up-daisy)

08 4 / 2013

27 2 / 2013

reptilesrevolution:

reptiglo:

mere-mereology:

“Meet the turtle frog (Myobatrachus gouldii).
The turtle frog is one of the most fossorial (living under ground) species of frog in Australia. It lives in the semi-arid regions of south-western Australia. Often inhabiting sandy soils where any free-standing water is quickly lost to the soil and evaporation.During the mating season, males will call on or just under the sand surface to attract a female. This usually occurs just after rain, which is a rare event. Females will locate calling males, but they do not mate straight away. They will bury themselves up to 1 metre and build an underground nest. Here they mate and lay their eggs. Strangely, the eggs do not develop into tadpoles but directly into small froglets. This direct development has evolved independently in many frog species. However it is usually to reduce the high level of tadpole predation that occurs in the permanent water bodies of very wet environments where the eggs are not at risk of drying up. Conversely, the turtle frog has evolved this method of breeding as a means of surviving in very dry environments.”

I remember seeing a documentary on these guys—they’re extremely interesting and have the funniest mating piles ever ahaha

Evolutionary Cuteness

reptilesrevolution:

reptiglo:

mere-mereology:

Meet the turtle frog (Myobatrachus gouldii).

The turtle frog is one of the most fossorial (living under ground) species of frog in Australia. It lives in the semi-arid regions of south-western Australia. Often inhabiting sandy soils where any free-standing water is quickly lost to the soil and evaporation.

During the mating season, males will call on or just under the sand surface to attract a female. This usually occurs just after rain, which is a rare event. Females will locate calling males, but they do not mate straight away. They will bury themselves up to 1 metre and build an underground nest. Here they mate and lay their eggs. Strangely, the eggs do not develop into tadpoles but directly into small froglets. 

This direct development has evolved independently in many frog species. However it is usually to reduce the high level of tadpole predation that occurs in the permanent water bodies of very wet environments where the eggs are not at risk of drying up. Conversely, the turtle frog has evolved this method of breeding as a means of surviving in very dry environments.”

I remember seeing a documentary on these guys—they’re extremely interesting and have the funniest mating piles ever ahaha

Evolutionary Cuteness

(via pushing-up-daisy)

25 2 / 2013

art-and-fury:

Lilith - Dan Quintana

art-and-fury:

Lilith - Dan Quintana

25 2 / 2013

25 2 / 2013

(via tuffbones)

24 2 / 2013

24 2 / 2013

heartbloodspirit:

 José Benlliure y Gil | The Barque of Charon, (1919)

heartbloodspirit:

 José Benlliure y Gil | The Barque of Charon, (1919)

(via c0untessbathory)

24 2 / 2013

24 2 / 2013

24 2 / 2013

24 2 / 2013

20 2 / 2013

deformalady:

Post-Mortem Pink Teeth Phenomenon
The appearance of pink teeth after death is a common phenomenon in forensic dentistry. It seems probable that coloration of the teeth would be found in those regions of the jaws where the blood is seeking on the basis of gravitation hypostasis. Thomas Bell first reported the phenomenon in 1829. He described a pink coloration in teeth of subjects that have drowned or been strangled.

deformalady:

Post-Mortem Pink Teeth Phenomenon

The appearance of pink teeth after death is a common phenomenon in forensic dentistry. It seems probable that coloration of the teeth would be found in those regions of the jaws where the blood is seeking on the basis of gravitation hypostasis. Thomas Bell first reported the phenomenon in 1829. He described a pink coloration in teeth of subjects that have drowned or been strangled.

(via pushing-up-daisy)